Redemption

DragonfliesIn the end, the little cut in the border saved this quilt.  You may recall that everything seemed to go wrong with the disappearing 9-patch baby quilt, including a small cut in a border that I identified only after the quilt was quilted. Stitching up the tear secured things and wasn’t all that noticeable, but I didn’t want to gift a damaged quilt.

Using a patch or appliqué to cover a hole in a garment or quilt is an age-old solution, and you know why? Because it works!

As it turns out, I had die-cut dragonfly appliqués in my stash that I’d picked up on a whim several years ago from the guild’s shop of the month.  I used the larger ones because the smaller ones lacked presence, even when a number of them were used together. Since the quilting was already done, my only option was to raw-edge appliqué them in place.

The finished quilt, after laundering.

The finished quilt, after laundering.

The added bursts of colour, and curves in contrast to the straight lines, really bring this quilt to life. As a tribute to these dragonflies, I call the quilt One Plus Three.

The quilt turned out so much better than I dared hope, that I will have to disappoint the generous souls who offered to take it off my hands. Sorry folks.

Detail of dragonfly appliqué

Detail of dragonfly appliqué

Mail for my Valentine

DH and I don’t usually make a big deal of Valentine’s Day. Nonetheless, on February 14th each year we exchange memorable cards. I had decided to make the card myself this year, and having taken a class on fabric collage last Saturday I was inspired to make a quilted valentine’s postcard. This is an original design. 

Valentine postcard

Valentine postcard

First I ironed some white Kona cotton to Pellon fusible fleece. Using a variety of reds from my stash, I free-hand cut the hearts and fused them to the prepared fleece. Next, I machine quilted the hearts to ensure they held fast.

The hearts were fused, left, then machine quilted, right.
The hearts were fused, left, then machine quilted, right.

 But how to embellish them? I thought that making 5 identical hearts would be boring, so I made 2 different from the rest. A 0.8 Micron Pigma pen was used to write “Happy Valentine’s Day” on the front.

Steps 3+4

Red and clear beads were hand sewn on the bottom left heart to echo the shape, while the top-most heart has a series of clear beads stitched to make a solid heart at the centre. The remaining three hearts were outlined with a running stitch of 3 strands of embroidery floss.

Given how often I mess up the message on paper greeting cards, I wanted to be sure I got the message right before attaching it permanently. So I wrote my personal message on a piece of fabric to which I had fused some Steam a Seam Lite. Once I was happy with what it said and how it looked, I fused the solid piece of fabric to the back and machine stitched around all layers at the outer edge.

The red and white twine I luckily bought on spec a few months ago was glued on top of the machine stitching. No photos of the back, of course.

Another view of the finished card

Another view of the finished card

I’d have posted this earlier, but DH is my most loyal fan and I didn’t want to spill the beans. Hope you were in touch with someone you love this Valentine’s Day.